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Policies


We're working on ideas and solutions that will improve the sustainability, resiliency, and equity of Denver's Food System.

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Policies


We're working on ideas and solutions that will improve the sustainability, resiliency, and equity of Denver's Food System.

Shaping policies that feed our city

In October 2010, Mayor Hickenlooper formed Denver’s Sustainable Food Policy Council (SFPC). The SFPC acts as an advisory entity to the City on matters of food policy and programs and facilitates policy-based change by convening working groups, helping conduct research, partnering on events, and holding public forums in order to raise awareness in the community about the issues and challenges with our food system.

here are some of the policy areas we are currently working on:

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City Food City Land


Let's utilize the land our city owns to grow food to feed our communities.

City Food City Land


Let's utilize the land our city owns to grow food to feed our communities.

policy overview

City Food, City Land is an initiative of the Denver SFPC aimed at identifying underutilized public land that has the potential to be used for food production. The SFPC is recommending that the City of Denver allow the following types of urban agriculture on identified land:

  • Demonstration Farms: sites aimed at educating the public about gardening, farming, nutrition, landscaping, and more.

  • Access Farms: farms that sell or donate fresh produce to underserved communities.

  • Commercial Farms: for-profit enterprises designed to operate as viable businesses and create jobs.

  • Edible Landscaping: installations of berries, fruits, and other crops designed to provide beauty and bounty while minimizing water usage and soil erosion.

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Residential Sales


Grow food at your house? Now you can sell your veggies from a home-based farmstand.

Residential Sales


Grow food at your house? Now you can sell your veggies from a home-based farmstand.

policy overview

The SFPC helped pass an amendment to the Denver Zoning Code to allow the sale of raw agricultural goods and homemade food products on residential properties.

This policy is aimed to help promote the cultivation of backyard and community gardens for personal use while also increasing the availability of fresh produce for sale in all Denver neighborhoods. The amendment only applies to fruits, vegetables and herbs and any food products made from plants grown on the same site. All raw food and products must be tied directly to the person selling it, and must be sold directly to the consumer.


resources

A recent update to the Denver Zoning Code now allows Denver residents to sell from their homes fresh produce and "cottage foods" that they grow and make themselves, with a permit. The change allows Denver residents living in residential zone districts to sell from their homes fresh produce they have grown themselves, and cottage foods, such as jams and honey, they have made themselves in their home kitchen.

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Increase SNAP Redemption


Let's make sure all residents in Denver can buy local, fresh food by ensuring all farmer's markets accept SNAP.

Increase SNAP Redemption


Let's make sure all residents in Denver can buy local, fresh food by ensuring all farmer's markets accept SNAP.

Policy overview

The SFPC supports the expansion of accepting Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits at all Denver farmers’ markets through the following tactics:

  • Seeking new and/or allocating existing funding, resources, and support to market managers to ensure that all farmers’ markets in Denver have the means to acquire current and supporting technology, such as Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) machines.
  • Seeking new and/or allocating existing funding, resources, and support for community outreach to SNAP recipients about the opportunities to redeem SNAP benefits at Denver farmers’ markets.
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Food Producing Animals


Residential Zoning Ordinance

Food Producing Animals


Residential Zoning Ordinance

policy overview

In 2011, the Denver SFPC helped rewrite Denver's zoning regulations regarding food producing animals. The changes now allow Denver residents to keep up to 8 chickens and/or ducks (no roosters or drakes) per residential lot, and up to 2 dwarf dairy goats (and any number of their offspring up to 6 months) per residential lot.


Guidelines

  • Must have 16 square feet of permeable ground per chicken.
  • Goats require 130 square feet of permeable ground.
  • Slaughtering is not allowed on residential property.

implementation

  • All backyard chickens and dwarf dairy goats must be permitted by submitting an application (link below) in person to Animal Control at 1241 W. Bayaud 80223
  • A one-time $25 'restricted livestock license' is required.

resources



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Policy Ideas


Share your policy ideas with the SFPC.

Policy Ideas


Share your policy ideas with the SFPC.

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Your ideas can make a difference

We'd love to hear your ideas on how to improve Denver's food system. Let us know what you think is needed to improve our local food system.